Doodles of flowers and swirls
Doodle of a man with a bow tie

Yesterday in our “What Can Doodling Do for You?” post I talked about the Nazca Lines having a greater purpose and meaning something more. This brought up questions for a lot of people: What do my doodles mean? Do they mean something deeper? If I doodle a lot, is there something wrong with me, or am I just creative?

I feel like I need to start with this: It’s best not to read too far into what your doodles are and what they mean. I say that because some people can get too caught up in the minute details of things and miss the bigger picture. The whole point of doodling is to calm yourself down, give your mind time to take a break, and to stop the overthinking that a lot of us do. If you’re looking too far into what your doodles mean then you may miss the whole point of things.

Doodling can definitely be how some people process information that is given to them quickly. It can simply be how some people learn. (Those types generally do have other creative leanings)

With all of that being said, our doodles can also tell us about our state of mind and where we’re headed in life.

If we’re drawing flowers, people smiling, and more positive type things, we are happier. If we’re in a funk or angry then we’re more likely to be drawing dark clouds with lightning bolts or people with no expression, or no face at all. If we feel out of control in a situation, we may start to draw figures that have no arms or hands (much like the one I drew above). If we feel like we don’t have any say so at the time we’re doodling, our figures may have no mouth, or the mouth may be closed/not smiling. If we’re feeling exposed, or vulnerable to the world, then we draw figures with no hair, or we draw more fragile things like flowers or birds.

The key to all of this is, those things that we associate with certain emotions, feelings, or states of being, are what we draw when we’re feeling those things. So everyone is different. If we think birds are fragile and symbolize being in a cage, then we will draw birds when we’re feeling that way. On the flip side, if we see birds as being happy and symbolizing freedom, then we draw birds when we’re feeling happy and free.

It’s often hard to tell what someone’s doodles mean without knowing that person, or knowing at least a little about them.

Another hitch is when our feelings get mixed up. For instance, when we’re sad and we’ve refused to acknowledge it for so long that it turns into anger at the world. Or when we’re so angry and we don’t know how to process it, and our anger turns inward and becomes sadness over what we don’t have.

The way that we write can tell us about ourselves as well. If we’re angry or frustrated about something then we tend to push down harder on the pen. The lines in the page will be deeper or they will show through to the next page. Or if you’re using crayons or colored pencils you may find yourself breaking the tips a lot more than normal. If you’re sad, or feeling left out or neglected, the opposite is often true; you will write and draw with a lighter touch. You’ll notice that letters may not be completely finished or lines may not connect.

These things may not be true in every single case, but they are generally true of people.

Pay attention to these little tell tell signs, but definitely don’t obsess over them. Sometimes we can spend so much time looking for the hidden meaning that we miss what is staring us in the face. For instance, if you keep drawing a house over and over again, you may just really want a new house. Or your inner knowing may be telling you that it’s time to “move” on. While you’re doodling a house and a tree, you may realize that you need to end the relationship that has been limping along for a while.

But again, don’t miss the forest for the trees. Don’t miss out on the benefit and stress yourself out more trying to figure out what it all means. Sometimes the lesson is in the doing.

For more on doodling, or if you missed our first post click here to read it.

Here are a few more doodling ideas to get you started. Just like yesterday, these could be done as a little doodling game with other people, a collective effort:

1) Have you ever tried doodle painting? It’s like what we used to do (or sometimes still do…=)) in Paint. Draw connecting lines all over a page. Once you’re finished, paint different colors inside each little section. You could also do this with colored pencils, crayons, or markers. Here’s an example. (You would paint in between the lines)

Doodle Painting Template

2) You’ve likely heard of zen tangles. But did you know how easy they are to draw? (These aren’t perfect, but hopefully you get the idea)

Zen Tangle Doodles

3) See if you can fill an entire page with the same little picture. Daisies for instance; or swirlies. Or both.

Flower and Swirl Doodles

4) Can you make a picture out of only straight lines? Or only squiggles?

Doodle on white paper

5) Can you doodle an entire picture with just one line, without raising your pen? (This one was a little more difficult, but fun)

Flower in a vase doodle

Have fun!!!!! Post pictures of your doodles on our Facebook page, or tag us on Instagram (@thenovelturtle)